Annagh East / An tEanach Thoir

Compiled by Robert Mulryan

Overview

Irish name: An tEanach Thoir

English name: Annagh East

Meaning: The east marsh

Area: 619 acres, 0 roods and 2 perches

Field Names: the Cruchains (a field with little hills near a bog), Gallyhatty, An Gort Ard (The high field), Inis (Island), An Triantán (The triangle)

Other Landmarks: An Claidh Teorainn (Boundary ditch/wall with Annagh West), Cúinne Uí Fhathaigh (Fahys corner), Cúinne Uí Seoige (Joyces Corner)

Information from O’Donovan’s Field Name Books

Other names: Eánach a marsh, Annagh, Annagh East, Annagh (Barony Map), Annagh (County Book), Anna (County Map), Annaugh (High Constable 1838), Annagho – Annagh (Local), Annaghs (Rector of Annaghdown).

Description: Proprietor French Esq. All under tillage [Unable to read.] Portion N. and South [Unable to read.] [Unable to read.] and subject to Winter floods.

Situation: It is situated 1 2/4 miles W. N.W. of Corrandulla Chapel. Bounded North by Lough Corrib. South Thonamace. East by Shanbally and West by Annagh [Unable to read.] and Lough Corrib.

National Inventory of Architectural Heritage

Two thatched houses in Annagh East appear on the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage. They are a survival of the vernacular building tradition in Ireland, and although once common within the rural landscape, they are a phenomenon that is becoming increasingly rare.

  1. Thatched House. “Detached four-bay single-storey vernacular house, built c.1800, with dormer attic and having late twentieth-century single-storey extension to rear. Pitched thatched roof with decorative knotting to raised ridge, and rendered chimneystack, stone copings and cement work to eaves. Pebbledashed walls to front with rendered plinth to sill level, and rendered and painted elsewhere. Square-headed openings with raised render reveals and painted stone sills. Replacement uPVC windows and doors throughout. Set at end of avenue with single-storey random rubble stone outbuildings to rear and rendered boundary wall to front. Outbuilding attached to north end having pitched corrugated-iron roof.”
  2. Thatched House. “Detached four-bay single-storey vernacular house, built c.1800, with dormer attic and having twentieth-century porch addition to front and gabled extension to rear. Pitched thatched roof with flush ridge, rendered chimneystack with lead apron, recent eyebrow dormers to front and rear slopes, and cement rendered copings to gables. Thatched hipped roof to porch and thatched pitched roof to extension. Random rubble limestone walls, render removed. Square-headed window openings with replacement timber windows, having render surrounds to front elevation, and stone sills. Square-headed glazed timber sheeted entrance door. Set parallel to road with gardens to front and rear, former having random rubble stone boundary wall with bow-topped piers having wrought-iron garden gate, and latter having remains of single-storey outbuilding.”

Population Statistics

The impact of the Great Famine on the village is clear to see between the censuses of 1841 & 1851.

1841: 27 houses, 156 people (81 male, 75 female)

1851: 11 houses (incl. 2 uninhabited), 44 people (20 male, 24 female)

1861: 10 houses, 51 people (22 male, 29 female)

1871: 10 houses, 52 people (22 male, 30 female)

1881: 9 houses, 53 people (23 male, 30 female)

1891: 10 houses, 43 people (18 male, 25 female)

1901: 8 houses (incl. 1 uninhabited), 36 people (15 male, 21 female)

1911: 8 houses, 37 people (19 male, 18 female)

2011: 23 houses (incl. 1 uninhabited), 70 people (41 male, 29 female)

1821 Tithe Applotment Books

The Tithe Applotment Books record Pat Flaherty, Michl Burke and partners as tenants of 91 acres of land, held from Robt J French Esq.

1840 Griffith’s House Books & 1855 Griffith’s Valuation

Annagh East entries in Griffith’s Valuation (1855)

Griffith’s Valuation records nine houses in Annagh East, occupied by Patrick Murphy, Patrick Flaherty, Mary Flaherty, Patrick Costello, William Burke (Michael), Jeremiah Lally, Bridget Fahy, John Gordan and William Burke.

The 1853 house book for Annagh East records the same occupants in the townland as the 1855 Valuation.

1901 Census

The 1901 Census of Ireland records the following 8 households and 1 uninhabited house in Annagh East.

  1. Mary Grady lived with her sons John, Patrick and Martin and daughters Bridget, Winifred and Ellen.
  2. Mary Burke lived with her son William, daughter-in-law Mary and grandson Patrick.
  3. John Fahy lived with his wife Bridget, daughter Kate and granddaughter Honor Killelea.
  4. Mary Lally lived with her son John, daughter in law Mary, granddaughters Bridget, Honor & Julia and grandson Michael.
  5. William Burke lived with his wife Julia, daughter Bridget and son Thomas.
  6. Martin Flaherty lived with his wife Julia and son Michael.
  7. Bridget Costelloe lived with her daughter Mary and son in law James Greany.
  8. Patrick Joyce Forde lived with his wife Mary, daughter Kate and son in law David Grealy.

Six houses were of the second class and two were of the third class. All houses had stone walls, thatched roofs and had between two and four rooms. Six houses had three front windows, one house had only one front window and one house had no front window at all. 5 houses had a stable, 5 had a barn, 5 had a piggery, 4 had a cart house, 3 had a fowl house and 2 had a cow house.

1911 Census

 By 1911, there is a third Burke household in the village and the Fahy/Killelea house had disappeared. There were 37 farm buildings in the village compared to 24 in 1901.

  1. Mary Grady lived with her sons John, Patrick and Martin and daughters Bridget and Ellen.
  2. Mary Burke lived with her son William, daughter in law Mary and grand sons Patrick, James, John, Willie and Thomas
  3. John Burke lived with his wife Mary, daughters Delis, Nora and May and son John.
  4. John Lally lived with his wife Mary, daughters Delia, Norah and Julia and son Michael.
  5. Julia Burke lived with her daughter Bridget and son Thomas.
  6. Martin Flaherty lived with his wife Julia and son Micheal.
  7. James Greaney lived with his wife Mary and son John.
  8. Patrick Forde lived with his wife Mary.

Seven houses were second class and one was third class. All houses had stone walls, thatched roofs and had between two and four rooms. One house had four front windows, six houses had three front windows and one house had two front windows. All 8 houses had a piggery, 7 had a stable, 7 had at least 1 cow house (1 house had 2 cow houses), 6 had a barn, 4 had a shed and 4 had a fowl house.

The Schools’ Collection

This was a collection of primary school copybooks gathered under the direction of the Irish Folklore Commission to bring together information on Irish traditions from across the country in 1937/1938.

With the help of his father Thomas, local school child James Burke wrote about the roads in the area and how they got their name. He also describes that during the famine, women broke stones into small pieces with hammers which the men then spread on the roads with horse and cart.

Map of Annagh East (1837-1842)
Annagh East / An tEanach Thoir

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