Cluidrevagh / An Chlúid Riabhach

Compiled by Gerry Morgan

Overview

Irish name: An Chlúid Riabhach

English name: Cluidrevagh

Meaning:   The streaked corner, grey nook or corner.  Riabhach: streaked, grey.

Area: 678 acres, 1 rood and 4 perches.

Other Names: Known locally as Cluide.  

Field Names: Páirc na Lacain – between Cluide and Feeragh.   (Schools’ Folklore Collection)

Other features: Tobar Gleannach – a well; Carraig an Aifrinn -a Mass Rock. (Schools’ Folklore Collection)

Other Landmarks:  

  • Cashel: “On a S-facing slope in undulating pastureland, in an area of outcroping rock. A disused quarry lies c. 50m to NW. The rock outcrop to N of the monument has been cleared as a result of recent land reclamation. Very poorly preserved subcircular cashel (N-S 36m, E-W 33m) defined by a drystone wall best preserved from W to N; elsewhere it is grassed over. Rock outcrop is visible within the interior as well as a number of grassed-over foundation lines. The above description is derived from the published ‘Archaeological Inventory of County Galway Vol. II – North Galway’. Compiled by Olive Alcock, Kathy de hÓra and Paul Gosling (Dublin: Stationery Office, 1999). Date of upload: 05 August 2010”  This feature is located towards the western boundary of the townland.
  • Cashel: “On a rise in low-lying grassland. Circular cashel (D c. 35m), in fair condition, defined by a drystone wall with traces of a shallow external fosse at S. A gap at NE appears modern. A field wall overlies the enclosing element at W. The above description is derived from the published ‘Archaeological Inventory of County Galway Vol. II – North Galway’. Compiled by Olive Alcock, Kathy de hÓra and Paul Gosling (Dublin: Stationery Office, 1999). Date of upload: 05 August 2010”.  This feature is located east of the centre of the townland.
  • Cashel: “On the summit of a ridge in grassland. Poorly preserved oval cashel (NW-SE 50m, NE-SW 35m) defined by a drystone wall, best preserved from NNW to NE. In SSW sector of the interior, a rectangular structure (NW-SE; L 3.2m, Wth > 1m) defined by a line of loose boulders is probably a house. To E lies a small circular hollow (D 1.5m). Abutting the enclosing element at NE is a semicircular enclosure (E-W 22m, N-S 20m) defined by a drystone wall. It may be associated. The above description is derived from the published ‘Archaeological Inventory of County Galway Vol. II – North Galway’. Compiled by Olive Alcock, Kathy de hÓra and Paul Gosling (Dublin: Stationery Office, 1999). Date of upload: 05 August 2010”.  This feature is located towards the eastern boundary of the townland.
  • Earthwork: “On a SW-facing slope in grassland. An almost circular earthwork (N-S 11.5m, E-W 10.5m), in a fair condition, comprising a bank of earth and stone (H 1.4m ext.) which encloses a hollow interior. The bank is overlain by a field wall from NNE to SE. A gap at SE may be modern. There are possible indications of internal revetment at W. A large quantity of stone is visible in W half of the interior. Possibly a house or a barrow. The above description is derived from the published ‘Archaeological Inventory of County Galway Vol. II – North Galway’. Compiled by Olive Alcock, Kathy de hÓra and Paul Gosling (Dublin: Stationery Office, 1999). Date of upload: 05 August 2010”.  This feature is located at the eastern boundary of the townland.

[All extracts from Geohive.ie Map of Recorded Monuments and Places.]

Information from the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage

1. Thatched Cottage:  “Detached three-bay single-storey vernacular house, built c.1800, having dormer attic, and with late twentieth-century flat-roof extension to front and mid-twentieth-century lean-to extension to rear. Pitched thatched roof with raised decorative ridge, and three rendered chimneystacks. Rendered and painted walls with raised quoins to front. Square-headed window openings having painted sills, one front window also having render surround, with replacement uPVC windows. Square-headed doorways having timber door to front and replacement uPVC door to rear addition. Set perpendicular to road with garden to front and yard to rear. Single-storey outbuilding to rear with pitched corrugated-iron roof and rubble stone walls. Rendered boundary wall to road with square rendered piers and metal gates and farmyard to north.”

2. Thatched Cottage: “Detached four-bay single-storey vernacular house, built c.1800, having dormer attic, and with single-storey late twentieth-century flat-roofed extension to rear. Pitched thatched roof with raised ridge, wire mesh to eaves, cement rendered chimneystack, and stone copings to gables. Lime rendered rubble stone walls. Square-headed window openings with two-over-two pane timber sliding sash windows with painted stone sills. Six-panel glazed timber door. Set back from road with garden to front behind rendered boundary wall with square gate posts and decorative wrought-iron pedestrian gate. Yard to rear with two single-storey outbuildings with corrugated-iron roofs and metal vehicular gates.”

Information from O’Donovan’s Field Name Books

Other names:  Clúid riabhach; Cluidrevag; Cludrebhagh; Cludreevagh, B. S. Sketch Map; Cludereaivagh, Barony Map; Clondreavagh, County Book; Cludereaivagh, County Map; Cludrevaugh, High Constable 1838; Cluidreavagh or Red Corner, Local; Cludereagh, Rector of Annaghdown.

Description: Major John Kirwan Esq., Castle Hacket, Proprietor. All under tillage except portion of rocky ground. There is a school erected by Dennis Kirwan Esq., in the S. E side of the townland.  

Situation:  It is situated 1 mile North of Cahermorris House. Bounded North by Biggera Beg. South by Cahermorris. East by Kicurriv Eighter and West by Fearagha.

Down Survey (1670)

Name:  Clondreaugh

1641 Owners(s): Skerret, Edmund (Catholic)

1670 Owner(s): Kirwan, John (Catholic)

County: Galway; Barony: Clare; Parish: Annaghdoon

Population Statistics

1841: 23 houses, 149 people (74 male, 75 female)

1851: 12 houses (incl. 1 uninhabited), 66 people (36 male, 30 female)

1861: 12 houses, 74 people (31 male, 43 female)

1871: 12 houses, 74 people (37 male, 37 female)

1881: 11 houses, 68 people (36 male, 32 female)

1891: 10 houses, 80 people (38 male, 42 female)

1901: 10 houses, 81 people (46 male, 35 female)

1911: 10 houses, 61 people (40 male, 21 female)

2011: 31 houses (incl. 2 vacant), 99 people (45 male, 54 female)

1826 Tithe Applotment Books

The Tithe Applotment Books (1826) group Cluide with Biggera as “Clood & Biggory”.  It records J, Kirwan Esq. as the proprietor.  It lists the following tenants: John Glynn (165 acres), Thos Connolly (68 acres), Thady Quin (20 acres), John & Rich. Burke (22 acres), Thos Lyddane (12 acres), James Costelloe (13 acres 2 roods), Thos Gibbons (6 acres), Widow Lyddane (2 acres), James Monaghan (12 acres), Peter Roche (37 acres 2 roods), Fras Dowd (27 acres), James Dowd (27 acres), Ths Burk (27 acres), Ths Hanley (25 acres), Ths Burke (5 acres), Peter Murphy (10 acres), James Grealy (10 acres) Michl Ward (11 acres 3 roods), Frans Shaughnassy (26 acres) and J Crampton (61 acres).  Their total levy was £25 1s 3 1/2d.  The levy was divided equally between Rev. R. Marley and J Kirwan Esq. (Landlord)

1840 Griffith’s House Books & 1855 Griffith’s Valuation

Cluidreveagh entries in Griffith’s Valuation (1855) 

In 1855 Griffith’s Valuation, the following list of names were recorded. Denis Kirwan owned a herd’s house, office and land.  His tenants were: John Burke, Judith Burke, James Costello, Richard Burke, John Hession, Martin Quinn, Jeremiah Grealy, William Dowd, Francis Dowd, Thomas Burke and Patrick Dowd.

The 1845 and 1853 Field Books record several of the names above.

1901 Census

The 1901 Census of Ireland records the following 81 individuals living in 10 households in Cluidrevagh.

  1. William Farrell (48) lived with his wife, Mary (46) [neé Dowd] , sons, Michael (21), John (18), Thomas (15), Patrick (13), Willie (7), daughters, Bridget (19), Winifrede (17), and Molly (10).
  2. Bridget Dowd (88) [neé Curran, d. 1903; widow of James Dowd, b. abt  1808, d. 1886], lived with her sons, Michael (53), not married, and Francis (60); daughter-in-law Bridget (45) [married 1875 in Caherlistrane, neé Glynn, Feeragh; father, Patrick Glynn], grandsons, James (20), Michael (15), Francis (5), granddaughters, Bridget (21), and Katie (10).
  3. Michael Burke (78) lived with his wife, Mary (78) [d. 1908, neé Burke, possibly], son, William (42), daughter-in-law, Bridget (35) [neé Fitzpatrick, married in Annaghdown, 1884], grandsons, Thomas (14), Michael (10), Patrick (6), Martin (5), James (2), John (11 months), daughters, Bridget (16), Mary (12) and Ellen (8).
  4. Patrick Greally (73) [d. 1907], only spoke Irish, lived with his wife, Anne (70) [neé Glynn, d. 1906], sons, Darby (45), not married, Patrick (43), his wife, Sarah (37) [married 1884; neé Lardner, Ballintleva; father, Thomas Lardner], grandsons, John (14), Martin (12), Patrick (6), Thomas (3), granddaughters, Annie (15), Mary (10), Bridget (8) and Katie (1).
  5. Mary Quinn (65), [neé Burke, widow of Martin Quinn, d. 1884], lived with her sons, Michael (30), unmarried, John (48) and his wife, Ellen (40) [married in Corofin, 1888; neé Coen, Anbally; daughter of Patrick Coen].
  6. James Costelloe (42) [d, 1902; father Michael; first wife, Mary Tarpey, Liscanane, father James Tarpey, married 1891 in Lackagh, b. abt 1870, d. 1898] lived with his [second] wife, Winnie (28) [neé Eagleton, Immon (probably Kilcreevy, Kilconly); married 1898, Kilconly; father, Mark Eagleton] and his sons, Michael (9), Patrick (7) and Thomas (4 months).
  7. Mary Burke (69), [neé Glynn, Fearagha] a widow [of Michael Burke, b. abt 1824, d. 1890], lived with her son, Richard (45) , a widower [married Bridget Greally in 1878 in Annaghdown], grandsons, John (18), Michael (14), Patrick (13), Martin (11), Richard (6), granddaughters, Mary (19) and Kate (9).
  8. Richard Burke (79) [d. 1906] lived with his wife, Ellen (74) [neé Burke or Healy], son, Patrick (46), daughter-in-law, Mary (50) [d. 1905, neé Naughton, Beaghmore; married in Caherlistrane 1878; father Thomas Naughton], grandsons, Richard (18), John (16), granddaughters, Mary (14), Winnifred (12), Delia (11) and Margaret (9).
  9. John Glynn (34) lived with his brother, James (32) and sister, Margaret (24).
  10. Patrick Burke (70) lived with his wife, Katie (68) [married 1855, Donaghpatrick, neé Boland], daughter, Mary (26), son, Michael (34) and daughter-in-law, Mary (23) [married in Annaghdown, 1901; neé Dowd, Cluide; father, Francis].

There were 8 second class houses and 2 third class houses listed in the 1901 census returns.  All houses had roofs made of thatch, wood or other perishable material and all had walls of stone, brick or concrete.  Two houses had 4 windows on the front, six had 3 windows and two had 2 windows.

1911 Census

There were still 10 households with a total of 61 individuals in Cluidrevagh recorded in the 1911 Census of Ireland.

  1. William Farrell (67) [house 1 in 1901], lived with his wife, Mary (69) [37 years married; 8 children born and 7 children living], sons, Michael (35), John (30), daughter, Bridget (33) [married name not recorded, probably Tymond], 2 years married; 1 child born and living; and granddaughter, Mary Tymond (6 months).
  2. Patrick Burke (81) [house 10 in 1901] lived with his wife, Kate (83), married 52 years; 5 children born, 3 living, son, Michael (50), daughter-in-law, Mary (35), married 10 years; 4 children born, 4 living, grandsons, Thomas (9), Patrick (5), Michael (2) and granddaughter, Mary (8). 
  3. Francis Dowde (70) [house 2 in 1901] lived with his wife, Bridget (56), 35 years married; 7 children born, 5 living, brother, Michael (66), sons, James (30) and Francis (15).
  4. Michael Burke (82), [house 3 in 1901] now a widower, lived with his son, William (53), married, his grandsons, Michael (21), Patrick (18), Martin (16), John (11), granddaughters, Bridget (25), Nora (8) and Katie (5).
  5. Patrick Greeley (55) [house 4 in 1901] lived with his wife, Sarah (50) [28 years married; 9 children born, 9 living], his sons, John (24), Patrick (14), Thomas (12), Jeremiah (6), daughters, Mary (19), Delia (16) and Katie (10).
  6. Mary Quinn (86) [house 5 in 1901], 62 years married; 7 children born, 4 living, a widow, lived with her son, Michael (38), John (60), his wife, Ellen (50), 22 years married; no listing of children; her granddaughter, Mary Coen (18).
  7. Winifred Costelloe (39) [house 6 in 1901], married 4 years; 4 children born, 2 living, now a widow, lived with her stepsons, Michael (19) and Patrick (17) [their mother was Mary Tarpey], and sons, Thomas (10) and Walter (8).
  8. Richard Burke (56) [house 7 in 1901], a widower, lived with his sons, John (26), Michael (23), Patrick (21), Martin (20), Richard (16), daughters, Mary (28) and Katie (18).
  9. Patrick Burke (56), [house 8 in 1901] now a widower, lived with his sons, Richard (30), John (28) and daughter, Mary (25).
  10. John Glynn (50) [house 9 in 1901] [married 1902 in Corofin to Delia Keane, Kilcurriff; father, Peter Keane], lived with brother, James (47).

There were 9 second class houses and 1 third class house listed in the 1911 census returns.  All houses had roofs made of thatch, wood or other perishable material and all had walls of stone, brick or concrete.  Nine houses had 3 windows on the front and one had 2 windows.  There were 11 stables, 10 cow houses, 4 calf houses, 10 piggeries, 1 fowl house, 9 barns, 2 workshops and 8 sheds.

Note: Information in squared brackets has been added by the author and does not appear in the original record.

Cluidrevagh / An Chlúid Riabhach

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