Corrandrum / Cor an Droma

Compiled by Paul Greaney

Note: Part of Corrandrum is in the civil parish of Annaghdown, with the remainder in the civil parish of Kilmoylan. Where a distinction is drawn in a particular record, both parts of the townland are given for completeness.

Overview

Irish name: Cor an Droma

Irish pronunciation:

English name: Corrandrum

English pronunciation:

Meaning: possibly the stone wall of the ridge? According to the Placenames Commission, it appears that the first element here is actually cora in its secondary sense of ‘stone wall’ (its primary meaning is ‘weir’). Cor an Droma is the official spelling since the publication of Ainmneacha Gaeilge na mBailte Poist in 1969.

Area: 107 acres, 2 roods, 12 perches (Annaghdown civil parish), 432 acres, 19 perches (Kilmoylan civil parish).

Field Names: None yet recorded.

Other landmarks: Ruins of St Cathal’s Church. Corrandrum Post Office was located in the adjoining townland of Cloonagh from 1952 until 1997. Corrandrum National School is located in the adjacent townland of Kilcahill.

Information from O’Donovan’s Field Name Books

Other names: Cor an Droma, Corrandrum, Curra an Druimhed, Currindrum (B. S. Sketch Map), Currandruimme (Local).

Description: Proprietor W. Lambert. All under Cultivation. The road from Galway to Tuam passes through the centre, and on its North [unable to read] is an old Burial Ground, and ruin of Church.

Situation: Proprietor W. Lambert. All under Cultivation. The road from Galway to Tuam passes through the centre, and on its North [unable to read] is an old Burial Ground, and ruin of Church.

Population Statistics

1841: 3 houses, 12 people (6 male, 6 female)

1851: No houses, no people

1861: 1 house, 3 people (1 male, 2 female)

1871: 4 houses, 21 people (11 male, 10 female)

1881: No houses, no people

1891: No houses, no people

Above are for the Annaghdown section of the townland only. The following are for the entire townland.

1901: 6 houses, 25 people (12 male, 13 female)

1911: 4 houses, 28 people (14 male, 14 female)

2011: 8 houses (incl. 1 uninhabited), 21 people (11 male, 10 female)

Tithe Applotment Books

Corrandrum is not mentioned in the Tithe Applotment Books for Annaghdown Parish. It appears only in the Kilmoylan applotment book, in which Henry Blake Esqr, Pat Burke & son, Wm. Brian, and James Lambert Esq. are recorded as holding land.

1855 Griffith’s Valuation

Corrandrum entries in Griffith’s Valuation for Annaghdown parish (1855)

Griffith’s Valuation for Annaghdown records John Burke as holding of a labourer’s house and land, while Michael O’Brien held land. Both were held from Thomas Lambert.

In the Kilmoylan parish part of Corrandrum, John Burke held a house, offices, labourers’ houses and land from James S. Lambert.

Corrandrum in Griffith’s Valuation for Kilmoylan parish

Valuation House & Field Books

The 1844, 1845 and 1846 field books for Corrandrum (Kilmoylan) record John Burke as the only landholder. The December 1853 house book for Corrandrum (Annaghdown) records William O’Brien and John Keane as householders, while the November 1853 house book for Corrandrum (Kilmoylan) records John Burke, John Feeny (herd’s house), Thomas Bohan, Mary Hughes, and Mary O’Brien (part of house).

1901 Census

The 1901 Census of Ireland records the following six households in Kilmoylan civil parish. No record appears for Annaghdown civil parish.

  1. John Burke (55), farmer; his wife Sabina [née Hession] (34); children Mary (8), John (5), scholars, and Annie (4); Kate Wall (17), general servant domestic; and Patrick Henehan (25), farm servant.
  2. Thomas Rielly (54), shepherd; his wife Ellen (52), and children Michael (17), labourer, and Ellen (11), scholar.
  3. Winifred O’Brien (34), farming; her sister Mary (32), farming; and brothers Edward (30) and Michael (28), farmer’s sons.
  4. John Morriss (70), farm servant, and his wife Bridget (60).
  5. John Walsh (40), herd; his wife Mary (39); Kate (15), Pat (13), Ellen (11), John (9), and Mary Walsh (7), all scholars.
  6. Ellen O’Brien (80), no occupation given, widow.

One house had a roof of slate, iron, or tiles, with between seven and nine rooms and five front windows, and was classified as second class. The remaining five houses had thatched roofs. One had three front windows and was of the second class; the remaining four were of the third class, three having two front windows and one having one front window and consisting of a single room.

Out-offices recorded in the townland were five stables, four coach houses, five cow-houses, four piggeries, a fowl-house, a turf house, a potato house, and a shed.

1911 Census

 By 1911, there were four households recorded in the Kilmoylan part of Corrandrum. No record appears for the Annaghdown part.

  1. John Morris (78), retired agricultural labourer, and his wife Bridget (75), married for 48 years with eight children born alive and six still living.
  2. John Walsh (54), herd; his wife Mary (54), herd’s wife, married for 26 years with five children born alive and still living; and children Patrick (23), herd’s son; Ellen (21), herd’s daughter; John (19), herd’s son; and Mary (16), herd’s daughter.
  3. Thomas Rielly (67), herd; his wife Ellen (65), married for 40 years with four children born alive and still living; son John (39), herd’s son, married; daughter Ellen (21); daughter-in-law Norah (32), married for 10 years with 4 children born alive and still living; grandchildren Thomas (8), John (6), Norah (5), scholars, all born in the United States of America; and Michael (1).
  4. Winiefred O’Brien (44), farmer; her sister Mary (35); and brothers Edward (33) and Michael (31), farmers.

One house had a roof of slate, iron, or tiles, with between seven and nine rooms and five front windows, and was of the second class. The remaining three houses had thatched roofs and comprised between two and four rooms; two were of the second class with three front windows, while the third had two front windows and was of the third class.

The house and building return also records Corrandrum RIC Hut as under construction.

Out offices recorded are three stables, a coach house, three cow-houses, two piggeries, three fowl-houses, a boiling house, two barns, a potato-house, and four sheds.

Corrandrum / Cor an Droma

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.