Kilgill / Cill Ghill

Compiled by Paul Greaney

Overview

Irish name: Cill Ghill

English name: Kilgill

Meaning: church of the pledge

Area: 311 acres, 3 roods and 19 perches

Field names in this townland: An Turlach Buí, Na Páircíní.

Information from O’Donovan’s Field Name Books

Names: Kilgill, Cill ghil, Killgill, Kilkill, Cilghulla, Kilgil (B. S. Sketch Map), Kilgil (Cahill, Esq., Annaghdown), Killgale (County Book), Killgill (High Constable, 1838), Kilgill (Local), Kilguill (Rector of Annaghdown).

Description: Proprietor Michael Browne, Esq., Moyne. Nearly all under tillage. There is a quarry situate 2 chains N. of its Southern boundary. Also a small patch of dry heathy pasture; a bye road passes past of its Northern boundary.

Situation: Situate about 1 mile E. of Annaghdown Church. Bounded on the N. by Ardgaineen S. by Slievefin and Racoona. E. by Kilcahill Cloonagh and Carrowauruan and W. by Cartron.

Population Statistics

1841: 27 houses, 156 people (78 male, 78 female)

1851: 17 houses, 98 people (48 male, 50 female)

1861: 14 houses, 73 people (36 male, 37 female)

1871: 12 houses, 79 people (40 male, 39 female)

1881: 11 houses, 70 people (35 male, 35 female)

1891: 12 houses, 59 people (30 male, 29 female)

1901: 13 houses, 69 people (32 male, 37 female)

1911: 13 houses, 77 people (34 male, 43 female)

2011: 32 houses, 89 people (42 male, 47 female)

1821 Tithe Applotment Books

The Tithe Applotment Books record Flaherty, Hessian and partners as tenants of 132 acres of land, held from M. Browne Esq. A further 63 acres were occupied by Browne himself.

1840 Griffith’s House Books & 1855 Griffith’s Valuation

Griffith’s Valuation records six houses in Kilgill, occupied by Martin Cunningham, Michael Glinn, Ulick Burke, Margaret Flaherty, Michael Skerritt and Margaret Morris. Lands were also held by Patrick Joyce, Peter Grealy, and by the landlord, Michael Browne of Moyne.  The 1840s house book for Kilgill records John Burke and Martin Flagherty (sic) as tenants in Kilgill, presumably the predecessors to Ulick Burke and Margaret Flaherty above, respectively.

Sale in Encumbered Estates Court, 1855

The townland of Kilgill was offered for sale by auction at the Land Judges Court on 4 December 1855, alongside the lands of Carrownrooaun and Cartron, as well as several other lots in counties Galway and Roscommon, all then in the possession of Michael Browne of Moyne. The lands of Kilgill were purchased by the Rev. Peter Daly of Galway Town described as a ‘ruthless landlord’ who ‘evicted tenants without mercy or compensation’. He would later be succeeded by Rev. Peter Dooley, before tenant purchases under the Land Acts in the early 1900s.

The following occupiers are recorded in the 1855 sale catalogue:

  1. Margaret Flaherty held 40 acres, 0 roods and 10 perches at an annual rent of £20. She was a tenant under the Court of Chancery for seven years, from 1 November 1852, or pending the cause of Greville against Browne.
  2. Margaret Morris held 2 acres, 0 roods and 7 perches at an annual rent of £1-16s-0d. She was a tenant under the Court of Chancery for seven years, from 29 September 1853, or pending the cause of Greville against Browne.
  3. Ulick Burke held 11 acres, 3 roods and 12 perches at an annual rent of £5-16s-0d. He was a tenant from year to year, with the tenancy determinable on 1 May each year.
  4. Michael Glynn held 11 acres, 3 roods and 12 perches at an annual rent of £5-16s-0d. He was a tenant from year to year, with the tenancy determinable on 1 May each year.
  5. Martin Cunningham held 26 acres, 0 roods and 8 perches at an annual rent of £13-4s-0d, with the tenancy held from year to year, determinable on 1 May each year.
    Martin also held two further portions, each of 47 acres, 3 roods and 6 perches at an annual rent of £14-15s-0d and £24-0s-0d. Both portions were tenancies under the Court of Chancery for seven years, from 25 March 1852 and 25 March 1854 respectively, or pending the cause of Greville against Browne.
  6. a. Patrick Joyce held 31 acres, 1 rood and 37 perches at an annual rent of £15-7s-6d. He was a tenant under the Court of Chancery for seven years, from 25 March 1853, or pending the cause of Greville against Browne.
    b. Patrick Joyce also held a futher 15 acres, 2 roods and 38 perches at an annual rent of £7-13s-8d, with the tenancy under the Court of Chancery for seven years, from 25 March 1854, or pending the cause of Greville against Browne.
  7. Patrick Flaherty held 23 acres, 2 roods and 22 perches at an annual rent of £11-12s-0d. He was a tenant under the Court of Chancery for seven years, from 25 March 1854, or pending the cause of Greville against Browne.
  8. Peter Greally held 17 acres, 0 roods and 25 perches at an annual rent of £8-8s-0d. He was a tenant under the Court of Chancery for seven years, from 25 March 1854, or pending the cause of Greville against Browne.
  9. An unset holding of 36 acres, 1 rood and 36 perches had an annual rent value of £13-1s-0d.

The Gale Days of tenancies 1, 3, 4, 5, and 7 were 1 May and 1 November, while those for the remaining tenancies were 25 March (Lady Day) and 29 September (Michaelmas). 25 March and 29 September were two of the four Quarter Days.

Map of Kilgill in the Encumbered Estates sale catalogue

1901 Census

The 1901 Census of Ireland records the following 13 houses in Kilgill:

  1. Martin Skerritt (50), farmer, his wife Norah (40) [née Gardiner], their children Delia (13), Maggie (11), Michael (9), John (7), (all scholars), Katie (5), Noney (3), Martin (1), and Martin’s mother Mary (70) [née Cunningham].
  2. Patrick Flaherty (70), farmer, his wife Mary (60) [née Reddington], their sons Martin (40), farmer, Robert (23), farmer’s son, daughter Julia (20), seamstress, and nieces Mary (5) and Bridget (3).
  3. Charles Nolan (35), carpenter, his wife Eliza (34) [née Hoare], daughter Mary (8), scholar, and mother-in-law Mary Hoare (75), grocer, widow.
  4. Mary Flaherty (60), farmer, and general servant Bridget Morris (25).
  5. Pat Skerritt (38), farmer, his wife Bridget (33), and children Michael (6), Mary (4), Martin (2), and Kate (11 months).
  6. Ellen Morris (63) [née Ruane], farmer, and children Margret (29), farmer’s daughter, Pat (32), and Michael (23), both farmer’s sons.
  7. Thomas Henighan (72), farmer, wife Kate (66) [née Laffey], and son Michael (24), farmer’s son.
  8. John Hession (39), farmer, his wife Margaret (35) [née Flaherty], brother Patrick (38), farmer, children Mary (4), Martin (2), and Michael (4 months), father Martin (70), and mother Mary (65) [née Burke].
  9. Patrick Cunningham (44), farmer, his wife Mary (35) [née Duggan], brother-in-law James Duggan (22), labourer, and first cousin Winifred Forde (12), scholar.
  10. John Burke (52), farmer his wife Mary Ellen (40) [née Joyce], daughters Katie (5), Mary (3 months), and mother-in-law Mary Joyce (82) [née Glynn], widow.
  11. Michael Hession (39), farmer, his wife Bridget (40) [née Glynn], son Denis (5), daughter Bridget (3), brother-in-law Michael Glynn (50), labourer, and niece Delia Glynn (23), seamstress.
  12. Martin Cunningham (36), farmer, his wife Maggie (30) [née Mulryan], sons Michael (9), John (7), scholars, and daughters Norah (5), scholar, and Margaret Mary (2).
  13. Michael Greaney (68), farmer, his daughter Nora (26), farmer’s daughter, and sons John (24) and Thomas (22), farmer’s sons.

All houses were of the second class with thatched roofs and three front windows, with the exception of the house of Thomas Henehan (house 7), which had two front windows and was of the third class. Each house had between 2 and 4 rooms, except for the houses of Patrick Cunningham (house 9) and Michael Greaney (house 13), both of which had 5 or 6 rooms each.

All inhabitants were recorded as having been born in County Galway, except for Eliza Nolan (house 3), who was born in America.

There were 5 monoglot Irish speakers recorded in the townland: Martin Skerritt (50) and his mother Mary Skerritt (70) in house 1, Patrick Flaherty (70) and Mary Flaherty (70) in house 2, and Ellen Morris (63) in house 6.

1911 Census

The 1911 Census of Ireland records the same 13 households in Kilgill as outlined above in 1901.

  1. Charles Nolan (47), carpenter, his wife Elize (47) [née Hoare], daughters Mary (18) and Margaret (3), and mother-in-law Mary Hoare (90). Mary Hoare was recorded as deaf.
  2. Micheal Greaney (79), farmer, widower, his son John (34), farmer, daughter-in-law Mary (30) [née Murphy], married for 6 years with 5 children; daughter Nora (28), grandchildren Mary (5), Delia (4), Micheal (2), Nora (1), and Katie (1 month), and farm servant Micheal Collins (20).
  3. Martin Cunningham (46), farmer, his wife Margaret (50) [née Mulryan], sons Michael (19), John (18), both farmer’s sons, and daughter Margaret M. (11), scholar.
  4. John Burke (68), farmer, his wife Mary Ellen (52) [née Joyce], and daughters Katie (15), and Mary (10), scholar.
  5. Michael Hession (48), farmer, his wife Bridget (52), children Denis (15), farmer’s son, and Bridget (13), scholar, brother-in-law Michael Glynn (60), farm servant, and niece Delia Glynn (29).
  6. Patrick Cunningham (54), farmer, his wife Mary (46) [née Duggan], married for 24 years, son-in-law James Duggan (32), daughter Maggie (28) [née Lawless], married for 7 years with 4 children; and grandsons-in-law Manus (6), scholar, James (4), Patrick (2), and Thomas (1) Duggan.
  7. Mary Hession (74) [née Burke], farmer, her son John (49), farmer’s son, daughter-in-law Maggie (49), grandchildren Mary (14), Martin (12), Michael (10), James (8), Sarah (5), all scholars, and son Patrick (47), farmer’s son.
  8. Ellen Henighan (44) [née Coen], farmer, and daughter Mary (6).
  9. Ellen Morris (75) [née Ruane], farmer, her son Patrick (44), farmer’s son, daughter-in-law Maria (31) [née Kelly], and granddaughters Delia (3) and Ellen (1).
  10. Patrick Skerrit (50), farmer, his wife Bridget (44) [née Hession], and their children Michael (16), farmer’s son, Mary (14), Martin (12), Katie (10), and Bridget (6), all scholars.
  11. Mary Flaherty (72), farmer, and domestic servant Bridget Morris (40).
  12. Martin Flaherty (50), farmer, widower, his daughters Mary (15) and Bridget (13), both scholars, brother Patrick (36), farmer’s brother, and sister Julia (30).

Each house was of the second class, with thatched roofs, between 2 and 4 rooms and 3 front windows, except for that of Mary Hession (7), which was of the third class with 2 front windows, and that of Mary Flaherty (11), which is recorded as of the third class with no front windows.

All residents were recorded as being born in County Galway, except for Eliza Nolan in house 1, who was born in America.

There was one monoglot Irish speaker in the townland: Ellen Morris (75) in house 9.

Note: Information in squared brackets has been added by the author and does not appear in the original record.

Kilgill / Cill Ghill

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