Cahermorris / Cathair Mhuiris

Compiled by Gerry Morgan

Overview

Irish name: Cathair Mhuiris

Link: www.logainm.ie

English name: Cahermorris

Link: www.logainm.ie

Meaning: The stone ring-fort of Muiris (www.logainm.ie); Morrissey’s stone fort (O’Donovan’s Field Name Books)

Area:  501 acres, 1 roods and 0 perches (Griffith’s Valuation); 500 acres, 2 roods and  32 perches (townlands.ie)

Field Names:

Other Landmarks:

  1. Cahermorris House.  “Occupied by Cecil Crampton in the mid 19th century. Two generations of Cramptons were rectors of Headford in the 18th century. A house still exists at the site as well as a fine entrance gateway”.  [landedestates.nuigalway.ie]
  2. Feature marked on 1830s, 6 inch map as “Site of Castle”.  Enclosure – large enclosure: “In rough scrub and grassland. When visited in September 1983, this monument consisted of a large roughly D-shaped enclosure (N-S 85m, E-W 80m) defined by a well-preserved drystone wall (Wth 2.9m, H 1.7m max.). A sketch plan by Westropp (1919, 168) shows a gap at NNE, probably the same point at which he noted ‘a slight trace of a mortar-built gateway’ (ibid., 182-3): no definite surface traces of either were found. The monument was almost completely levelled in April/May 1991 as a result of land clearance. A castle (GA056-042—-) stood in the interior and a ringfort (GA056-043002-) lies 25m to NW. (Anon. 1919, 165)”.    The above description is derived from the published ‘Archaeological Inventory of County Galway Vol. II – North Galway’. Compiled by Olive Alcock, Kathy de hÓra and Paul Gosling (Dublin: Stationery Office, 1999). [Extract from Geohive.ie Map of National Monuments.]
  3. Ringfort – cashel.  “Some 25m NW of a large enclosure (GA056-043001-). When inspected in September 1983 this poorly preserved circular cashel (D 35m) was defined by a collapsed drystone wall (Wth 1.8m; H 0.3-0.4m) which was obscured by overgrowth. A field wall cut through the monument at NW and SE. On re-inspection in May 1991 it was noted that as a result of land clearance in the area field-clearance rubble was dumped against the external face of the E half of the cashel wall. The above description is derived from the published ‘Archaeological Inventory of County Galway Vol. II – North Galway’. Compiled by Olive Alcock, Kathy de hÓra and Paul Gosling (Dublin: Stationery Office, 1999).  [Extract from Geohive.ie Map of National Monuments.]
  4. Ringfort – cashel.  (Marked on 1830s, 6-inch map as a Caher.)  “In undulating grassland. This poorly preserved subcircular cashel (N-S 30m) is defined by a drystone wall that is reduced to a rubble spread (Wth 2-2.5m; H 0.2-0.3m). The interior is overgrown with trees. In the NW quadrant there is a subrectangular depression (L 6.5m, Wth 3.8m) running NW-SE. On its E side, definite traces of stone-facing are visible. These remains may represent a possible souterrain (GA056-041001-). (Westropp 1919, 183; Killanin and Duignan 1967, 304) The above description is derived from the published ‘Archaeological Inventory of County Galway Vol. II – North Galway’. Compiled by Olive Alcock, Kathy de hÓra and Paul Gosling (Dublin: Stationery Office, 1999).  [Extract from Geohive.ie Map of National Monuments.]

Information from National Inventory of Archtectural Heritage

1. Thatched cottage.  “Detached four-bay single-storey vernacular house, built c.1800, having windbreak to entrance, and single-storey late twentieth-century extension to rear. Pitched thatched roof with decorative knotting to raised ridge, low rendered chimneystack, and cement copings to gables, and flat roof with parapet to windbreak. Rendered walls with rendered plinth, bevelled quoins to front corners of building and of windbreak, and render eaves course. Square-headed window openings with replacement timber casements, painted stone sills and raised render reveals. Square-headed glazed timber door. Set parallel to road with garden to front with rendered boundary wall and piers with metal gate. Two outbuildings to north with pitched corrugated-iron roofs and random rubble walls.”

2. Entrance gateway to Cahermorris House.  “Entrance gateway, erected c.1880, to Cahermorris House. Round-plan piers of hammer-finished ashlar limestone, with tooled square-edged string course and tooled conical caps, with recent decorative metal gates, flanked by coursed random rubble stone walls with ‘Buck and Doe’ rubble coping.”

Information from O’Donovan’s Field Name Books

Other names: Cathair Muirghiosa; Cahirmorish – Inq. Temp. Ire. I; Cahirmorish – Inq. Temp. Eliz.; Cahermorrish; Cahermorris, B. S. Sketch Map; Cahermorris, Barony Map; Cahermorris, County Map; Cahermorris, High Constable 1838; Cahermorrish, Local; Caher Morris Morrisfort, Local; Cahermorriss, Rector of Annaghdown.

Description: [Unable to read.] Proprietor Major Kirwan, Esq. Under tillage. Cahermorris House and Demesne West side [Unable to read.] there is a public house and [Unable to read.] in this townland.

Situation: It is situated 2 3/4 N. W. of Annaghdown church. Bounded North by Cluidrevagh. South by Glanreavagh. East by Buna[Unable to read.]beg and West by part of Kilcoony.

Information from the Down Survey (1670)

Name: Cair morris

1641 Owner(s): Skerret, Edmund (Catholic)

1670 Owner(s): Birne, Barnaby (Catholic)

County: Galway; Barony: Clare; Parish: Annaghdoon

Profitable land: 68 plantation acres.

Forfeited: 68 plantation acres.

Population Statistics

1841: 45 occupied houses + 0 unoccupied houses, 282 people (145 male, 137 female)

1851: 3 occupied houses + 1 unoccupied house, 41 people (21 male, 20 female)

1861: 9 occupied houses + 0 unoccupied houses, 50 people (23 male, 27 female)

1871: 9 occupied houses + 1 unoccupied house, 44 people (23 male, 21 female)

1881: 7 occupied houses + 1 unoccupied house, 40 people (19 male, 21 female)

1891: 6 occupied houses + 0 unoccupied houses, 37 people (20 male, 17 female)

1901: 6 occupied houses + 0 unoccupied houses, 38 people (19 male, 19 female)

1911: 6 occupied houses + 0 unoccupied houses, 41 people (22 male, 19 female)

2011: 21 occupied houses + 3 unoccupied houses, 56 people (28 male, 28 female)

1821 Tithe Applotment Books

The Tithe Applotment Books list Martin McHugh as tenant with 12 acres; Pat McHugh with 10 plus 26 acres; “Widow” Dowd with 2 acres; John Connell with 3 acres 1 rood; John Long with 2 acres 2 roods 30 perches; James Dowd with 1 acre 2 roods; Pat Drinane with 2 acres 24 perches; Bartly Hanley with 1 acre 2 roods; Ths. Craven with 1 acre 2 roods; David Lanigan with 1 acre 31 perches; John Burke with 1 acre 1 rood; Murty Noally with 2 acre 2 roods; John Ford with 1 acre 1 rood 9 perches; James Ruane with 2 acre 2 rood 32 perches; and J Crampton with 12 plus 30 plus 207 acres.  The total levy was £20 19s 11 1/2d which was divided equally between the Rev R. Manley and J Kirwan Esq. (Landlord).

1840 Griffith’s House Books

Henry J. Blake is listed in the House Books with a house and offices valued at £18 in the 5 December 1843.

In the House Books dated 19 July 1845, it is noted that Patt Commons (Camerons) assumed the tenancy of a Dwelling, Stables and Barn, valued at £5 2s 8d from Patt McKew.  Cecil Crampton Esq. assumed the tenancy of several buildings, valued at £32 16s 7d, from Henry Blake Esq. The buildings consisted of a Dwelling; Hall; Return; Privy; Store; Larder, Dairy & Laundry; Open Shed; Piggery Calf House; Coach ho., Stables & W. Shop; Stable Barn & Coach ho.; Garden ho.

In the House Books, dated November 1853, James Fitzpatrick is listed as occupying a house.  John Lenihan occupied a house; John Burke occupied a house & offices; James Ruan a house & offices; Patt Commons a herd’s house and offices; Judith Burke a house & offices; John Flanagan a house and offices; and Andrew Hare a herd’s house.  Cecil Crampton is also listed as occupying the buildings described in July 1845 listing (previous paragraph).

1855 Griffith’s Valuation

Cahermorris entries in Griffith’s Valuation (1855)

In 1855 Griffith’s Valuation, the following 19 people are listed as tenants with houses in Cahermorris:

James Fitzpatrick, John Lenihan, John Burke, James Ruan, Patrick Commons, Judith Burke, John Flanagan, Andrew Hare and Cecil Crampton.  In addition, Peter Greany, William Morris, John Farraher and Patrick Wade were tenants of land only.

1901 Census

The 1901 Census of Ireland records the following 38 individuals living in 6 households in Cahermorris.

  1. Thomas Burke (55) lived with his wife, Mary [née Burke, Cluidrevagh] (37), sons, Michael (16), William (12), Thomas (5), James (6), Richard (4), and daughters, Maggie (19), Julia (17), Mary (13), Katie (10), Winnie (0).
  2. Bridget Burke [née Fitzpatrick, widow of  John Burke] (73), lived with her son, William (31), daughter in law, Julia [née Duggan, Liscananaun, Lackagh Civil Parish] (40), grandson, John (3), and granddaughters, Bridget (7), Maria (5), Winifred (4).
  3. Michael Fitzpatrick, a widower (70) lived with his son, James (40), his daughter in law, Anne [née Fahy, Kilcurriff, Cummer Civil Parish] (36), grandsons, Martin (12), Michael (6), Thomas (0), and granddaughters, Mary (8), Catherine (3).
  4. Catherine Flanagan [née Morris, widow of John Flanagan] (65) lived with her sons, Michael (25) and John (18).
  5. Patrick Greany (65) lived with his wife, Honor [née Moran, Bredagh, Kilcoona Civil Parish] (61), son, Peter (24), daughter, Margaret (26) and granddaughter, Bridget Burke (3) [parents: Thomas and Ellen [née Greaney] Burke, Bredagh, Kilcoona Civil Parish].
  6. Patrick McHugh (40) lived with his wife, Norah [née Diskin, Curraghan, Dunmore Civil Parish] (24), and nephew, Patrick (18).

There was one first class house (Patrick McHugh), four second class houses and one third class house listed in the census return.  The first class house had a roof of slate, iron or tile while all the remaining houses had roofs of thatch, wood or other perishable material.  All had walls of stone, brick or concrete. Patrick McHugh’s house had seven windows at the front, while four other houses had three and one had two windows at the front.  No data is recorded for outhouses.

1911 Census

There were still 6 houses in Cahermorris with 41 occupants in 1911.

  1. Patrick McHugh [house 6 in 1901] (52) lived with his wife, Honor [née Diskin, Curraghan (Dunmore Civil Parish)]  (33), his brother, Daniel (54), his sons, Patrick (7), James (5), Daniel (3), John (0) and daughter, Mary (9).
  2. Nora Greaney [house 5 in 1901] [née Moran, Bredagh] (71), by now a widow, lived with her son, Peter (30) and daughter-in-law, Kate [née O’Connor, Ummeracly West, Addergoole Civil Parish, near Milltown] (25).  Ellen Daly (21) was recorded as a visitor on the day of the census.
  3. Thomas Burke [house 1 in 1901] (67), lived with his wife, Mary [née Burke, Cluidrevagh] (49), his sons, William (20), Thomas (16), James (14), Richard (12), John (7), and daughters, Maggie (25), Kate (18), Winnie (9).
  4. Bridget Burke [house 2 in 1901]  [née Fitzpatrick, widow of John Burke] (86) lived with her son, William (42), daughter-in-law Julia (46) [née Duggan, Liscananaun, Lackagh Civil Parish], grandson, John (16), and granddaughters, Delia (16), Mary (14), Winnifred (12).
  5. Catherine Flanagan [house 4 in 1901] [née Morris, widow of John Flanagan] (72), lived with her son, Michael (35) and daughter-in-law, Bridget (32).
  6. Michael Fitzpatrick [house 3 in 1901], a widower, (80) lived with his son, James (52), his daughter in law, Anne [née Fahy, Kilcurriff, Cummer Civil Parish] (47), his grandsons, Martin (22), Michael (16), Thomas (12), granddaughters, Mary (18), Kate (14), and also his son, Michael (44).

There was one first class house (Patrick McHugh) and five second class houses listed in the 1911 census return. The first class house and one second class house (Thomas Burke) had roofs of slate, iron or tile while all the remaining houses had roofs of thatch, wood or other perishable material.  All had walls of stone, brick or concrete. There was one house with seven windows at the front, one with four front windows, and four with three windows at the front. Most homes also had a stable, cow house, piggery and barn.  In total there were 6 stables, 6 cow houses, 3 calf houses, 6 piggeries, 4 fowl houses, 5 barns, 1 potato houses, 2 sheds and 3 coach houses in the townland.

Cahermorris / Cathair Mhuiris

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